Health Tip: Keep Kids Away From Button Batteries

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Health Tip: Don't Be Surprised by Fall Allergies

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Few Young U.S. Burn Patients Transferred to Specialized Centers


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MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Few American children with significant burns are transferred to burn centers, despite current recommendations, a new study finds.Clearer guidelines are needed on the care of pediatric burn patients, said the researchers after analyzing 2012 data from emergency departments across the United States.The investigators found that nearly 127,000 children suffered burn injuries that year, and more than half (69,000) had significant burns. That means significant burns occur to about 189 U.S. children a day.The American Burn Association recommends that children with significant burns be referred to a burn center for evaluation and care.But this study found that among children with significant burns seen at hospitals that handle few such cases, about 90 percent were treated and released from the emergency department. Four percent were admitted to the hospital and not transferred, and 5.6 percent were transferred to another hospital, the researchers said.”While the …
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Coping With College Stress


Latest Mental Health News

MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Stress and anxiety are common among new college students, but there are ways to cope, a doctor says.”For incoming college freshmen, going away to school means leaving family and a familiar environment for a place with new people, new responsibilities, less support and a whole new set of challenges,” said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein. He is president and CEO of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation.”It’s natural for people to experience some anxiety in the face of new situations, but there is a difference between nerves and the kind of overwhelming anxiety that affects a student’s ability to succeed academically or socially,” Borenstein said in a foundation news release.”The temptations of the college lifestyle — lack of sleep, misuse of alcohol and poor eating habits — can exacerbate anxiety and affect a student’s ability to focus,” he added.But there …
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Mouse Study Suggests Brain Circuit Involved in Sleep-Wake Cycle


Latest Sleep News

MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Scientists say they’ve identified a brain circuit in mice that plays a key role in the sleep-wake cycle.The circuit is a key component of the brain’s reward system, according to researchers from Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. The investigators saw that as the mice ramped down for sleep, activity in this brain circuit decreased. The researchers also saw that activating this circuit could rouse the animals from sleep.These findings could potentially lead to new treatments for sleep problems, the researchers said.”This has potential huge clinical relevance,” senior author Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said in a university news release.”Insomnia, a multibillion-dollar market for pharmaceutical companies, has traditionally been treated with drugs such as benzodiazepines that nonspecifically shut down the entire brain,” he explained.”Now we see the possibility of developing therapies that, by …
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Chickenpox Cases Down 85 Percent Since 2-Dose Vaccine Started: CDC


Latest Infectious Disease News

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Chickenpox — which is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — has continued declining in the United States since 2006, when doctors began routinely recommending a second dose of chickenpox (varicella) vaccine, U.S. health officials said Thursday.States reporting vaccination data noted an 85 percent drop in the highly contagious disease between 2005-2006 and 2013-2014, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The fall-off was greatest among kids aged 5 to 14, health officials said. This is also the age group most likely to have received the second dose of varicella vaccine.Symptoms of chickenpox include an itchy, blistery rash, tiredness and fever. It tends to be more serious in babies, adults and people with a weakened immune system, the CDC noted.Before vaccination, chickenpox was commonplace, with 4 million Americans on average getting the virus annually in the …
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3 Zika-Carrying Mosquitoes Found in Florida


Latest Infectious Disease News

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Three mosquitoes in Miami Beach have tested positive for the Zika virus, a first in the continental United States, Florida health officials said Thursday.The mosquitoes were trapped in the same area where several cases of human infection have occurred, officials said.Ninety-five additional mosquito samples were subsequently tested for Zika and those mosquitoes were found to be Zika-free, the officials said. “This find [of the three mosquitoes] is disappointing, but not surprising,” Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam said in a news release. “Florida is among the best in the nation when it comes to mosquito surveillance and control, and this detection enables us to continue to effectively target our resources. Miami-Dade County, the City of Miami Beach, and state and federal partners will continue to work aggressively to prevent the spread of Zika,” he added.Florida is the only …
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Review Suggests Safe, Effective Ways to Relieve Pain Without Meds


Latest Chronic Pain News

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Popular drug-free methods of managing pain from such common conditions as headaches and arthritis appear to be effective, according to a new review.Millions of Americans seek pain relief through such alternatives as acupuncture, tai chi and yoga. But there has been little information to help doctors make recommendations about these approaches.”For many Americans who suffer from chronic pain, medications may not completely relieve pain and can produce unwanted side effects. As a result, many people may turn to nondrug approaches to help manage their pain,” study lead author Richard Nahin said in a U.S. government news release. “Our goal for this study was to provide relevant, high-quality information for primary care providers and for patients who suffer from chronic pain,” Nahin added. He is lead epidemiologist at the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). …
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BCBS Medigap pricing to jump


TRAVERSE CITY — Michigan seniors should take a close look at their Medicare supplemental insurance in the next few weeks.Rates for Blue Cross Blue Shield’s Plan C Legacy Program “medigap supplement” plans have been frozen since 2011. They will go up — by a substantial amount — on Jan. 1.About 250,000 Michigan residents — including 5,024 in Antrim, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska and Leelanau counties — will be affected by the price increase.
BCBS covers so many Michigan seniors because it has for decades functioned as the state’s only “provider of last resort,” said Andrew Hetzel, vice president for corporate communications at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. That means BCBS could not refuse coverage to anyone, and by state regulation had to provide coverage at prices below the actual cost of benefits. BCBS, in exchange for providing the service, was exempted from paying state and local taxes.”That was the structure that the state put into …
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Opioid Abuse Fueling Drug-Related Heart Infections: Study


Latest Mental Health News

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The number of Americans hospitalized with heart infections caused by use of injected opioid drugs is on the rise, a new study indicates.Researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston said the finding is a disturbing outgrowth of a rising tide of opioid addiction in the United States.For the study, the researchers reviewed U.S. hospital admissions for infective endocarditis, a sometimes deadly infection of the heart valves. Although people born with abnormal valves and older adults with valve problems are at added risk for the condition, it can also result from injecting drugs. Injections can introduce bacteria into the bloodstream, the researchers said.In 2013, 12 percent of hospitalizations for infective endocarditis were related to injection drug use, compared to 7 percent in 2000, the study team found. The actual number of cases rose to 8,530 from 3,578.”As clinicians, we have observed …
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